Title
Thesis statement
Simon
Power of Silence in Patrick Suskind's Perfume and Herman Hesse's Siddhartha

Silence allows the characters in Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, by Patrick Suskind, and in Siddhartha, by Herman Hesse to reach revelations about either themselves or others.
Sarah
The role of characters’ performances in Patrick Süskind’s Perfume: the Story of a Murderer and Yukio Mishima’s The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea
The multiple roles that characters play in their novel’s very own “theater” demonstrate as they are driven by the appearances they must uphold to “blend” into society in order to achieve their respective goals
Diane
How the motif of homes/ household items illustrate that happiness overpowers wealth in Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse, and the Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea by Yukio Mishima.
Homes and household items show that money cannot buy happiness.
Daphne
The significance of light in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha and Yukio Mishima’s The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With The Sea
In Siddhartha, light reveals how the status of Vasudeva and Siddhartha is equal to that of Gotama. In The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With The Sea, light describes desire.
Emily
Title: The Differing Definitions of “Enlightenment” in Patrick Suskind’s Perfume: The Story of a Murderer and Herman Hesse’s Siddharta and their Roles in Defining Respective Protagonists to Emphasize the Need for a Balance between Logic and Reason

“Enlightenment” refers to the Age of Reason in which logic and reason were the principal authorities in Perfume: The Story of a Murderer by Patrick Suskind, whereas in Siddharta, by Herman Hesse, “enlightenment” is the state of being free from suffering in which introspection and feeling are emphasized as the primary modes of thought, and it is this contrast of the term “enlightenment” between the two novels as well as the two protagonists’ resulting fates emphasizes the necessity for a balance between reason and emotion.

Dong Hyeok
Role of Sex in Yukio Mishima’s The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea and Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha
: Sex leads both Ryuji and Siddhartha to forsake their previous identity and to learn valuable lessons in life.
Jacques
The Compression of Grand Power Into Smaller Entities in Perfume: The Story of a Murderer by Patrick Suskind and Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The compression of grand power into smaller entities reveals that despite a transfer of great power through a perceivable medium, it is difficult to transform innate identities.
Isabel
Fruit indicates both positive and negative relationships in Perfume: The Story of a Murderer by Patrick Suskind and Siddhartha by Herman Hesse.
Fruit’s juice, seeds, color and shape highlight and foreshadow both positive and negative relationships within the two novels.
Amanda
Exposure as a means of Deception in Perfume: The story of a Murderer by Patrick Suskind and The Sailor who fell From Grace with the Sea by Yukio Mishima
Characters expose themselves and put themselves in exposing settings to deceive those around them.
Cameron
Food and consumption: Paralleling the emotional and mental wellbeing of the protagonists in Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse and Perfume by Patrick Süskind.
In both Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse and Perfume by Patrick Süskind different types of food, and its consumption or lack thereof, serves to parallel the emotional and mental wellbeing of the protagonists.
Vincent
The failure to achieve self-discovery in Yukio Mishima's The Sailor who Fell from Grace with the Sea and Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha


Through the failure of both Ryuji, from Yukio Mishima's The Sailor who Fell from Grace with the Sea, and Govinda, from Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha, attempt to achieve self-discovery, both Mishima and Hesse may be suggesting that humans, like all other animals, require the influence of nature to truly live a fulfilled life.
Britain
The Futility of using books and writing to learn in Perfume: The Story of a Murderer by Patrick Süskind and Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse


The novels Perfume: The story of a Murderer by Patrick Süskind and Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse demonstrates the futility of books or reading and writing in order to learn, as the protagonists surpass the knowledge of minor characters without the assistance of literature.
Natalie
The contrasting levels of clarity represented by eyes in the novels Perfume: The Story of a Murderer by Patrick Suskind and Siddhartha by Herman Hesse



Eyes allow the understanding of the character’s individual characteristics by revealing emotion and experience through the expression and nature of the eyes. However, within the novel, vision serves as a catalyst for misjudgment and wrongful decisions, whereas sightlessness provides concentration and allows for characters to focus on their initial goals.
Kathy
The Role of Darkness in Suskind’s Perfume: the story of a murderer and Mishima’s The Sailor who Fell from Grace with the Sea


Darkness increases character’s intimacy or proximity and serves as a catalyst for the realization that they cannot keep their passions in the dark, which results in exposure to the light as well as pursuing their goals.
Jocelyn
Religious References in Patrick Süskind’s Perfume: Story of a Murderer and Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha

Religious references glorify the main characters, both to bestow glory to Jean-Baptiste Grenouille in Perfume: The Story of a Murderer by Patrick Süskind and to further glorify Siddhartha in Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse. However, in Perfume, Süskind uses religious allusions to criticize religious followers and ultimately religious institutions, while Hesse uses religious references to depict the positives of following a spiritual path.
Michael R
Significance of the progression of Grenouilles’ and Norborus’ reactions from passion to nonchalance as they approach their goals in the novelsPerfume: The Story of a Murderer” by Patrick Suskind and ‘The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea” by Yukio Mishima


the identical reactions displayed by Grenouille and Noboru in similar situations respectively create chronologically smooth progressions towards the characters’ dispassion
Riowena
Settings as reflectors of turning points in character relationships in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha and Yukio Mishima’s The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea

Empty, desolate settings reflect negative turning points in relationships that the protagonists Siddhartha and Noboru Kuroda have with other characters in their respective novels, shedding light on the progressive deteriorations of these relationships.
Michael X
Animals as reflections of characters activeness in Patrick Süskind’s Perfume: The Story of a Murderer and Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha


The animals used to parallel Grenouille and Siddhartha, central characters of Patrick Süskind’s Perfume: The Story of a Murderer and Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha respectively, before and after their pursuit of a life goal become passive to active, reflecting the change in their activeness in the novel.
John W
Siddhartha and Grenouille's experience of internal and external factors as ways of discovering happiness.


In the novels Siddhartha and Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, the protagonists Siddhartha and Grenouille experience temporary happiness in their lives by indulging in the gratification of their physical selves but eventually discovers a greater satisfaction in the form of inner mental contentment.

Jerry
The role of objects in motion in Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha and Yukio Mishima’s The Sailor who Fell from Grace with the Sea
Objects in motion serve to portray the change in Siddhartha and Ryuji’s understandings of the world around them and characterize Ryuji and Siddhartha for the readers
Shavonne
Women’s dominance expressed through the use of their households in Yukio Mishima’s The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea and Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha
Fusako and Kamala’s dominance in their relationships with Ryuji and Siddhartha is expressed through the use of their households.
Chris Hwa
Endurance Demonstrates Protagonist’s Invincibility

In Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, by Patrick Suskind, and in Siddhartha, by Herman Hesse, the protagonists’ physical or mental endurance of pain reveals their invincible qualities in achieving their goals.
Gilbert
The role of giving in revealing the underlying, and often selfish, motives of individuals in Patrick Suskind’s Perfume and Yukio Mishima’s The Sailor who Fell from Grace with the Sea
In Perfume and Sailor, people giving other people things is merely done for personal advantage, characters in both novels display a similar feature of giving so that they can get back in return different forms of satisfaction.
William
The distinctive roles that songs play in each protagonists life in Yukio Mishima’s The Sailor Who fell from Grace with the Sea and Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha.

The distinctive roles that songs play in each protagonist’s lives reveal Ryuji’s inner conflict and his difficulty in interacting with others from the land in Yukio Mishima’s The Sailor Who fell from Grace with the Sea and the teaching of perfection to Siddhartha in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha.
Oli

The immoral actions of violence and spying done by the protagonists in, Perfume and Sailor, ironically serve as a way for Grenouille and Noboru to achieve self-satisfaction.
Henry
Stripping for Benefits in Perfume by Patrick Suskind and the Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea by Yukio Mishima
Stripping serves to redefine goals for the protagonist in Perfume by Patrick Suskind and the Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea by Yukio Mishima

He Ra
The Significance of Involuntary Sacrifices of Laure Richis in Patrick Suskind’s Perfume and Kamala in Hermann Hesse’s Siddharatha

The involuntary sacrifices of Laure Richis in Patrick Suskind’s Perfume and Kamala in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha contribute to Grenouille and Siddharta’s attainment of aspiration and induce significant alteration which further leads to a greater understanding in their lives, respectively.
Wendy
Indifference in Murder in Patrick Suskind’s Perfume: The Story of a Murderer and Yukio Mishima’s The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With the Sea
Grenouille and Noboru's indifference in murder is shown through the preparation and process of killing, as well as the very mechanic and emotionless descriptions of the corpse.
valerie
Interaction with mentors leading to unintentional lessons as well as achieving goals in Herman Hesse's Siddhartha and
Yukio Mishima's The Sailor who fell from Grace with the Sea.
: In both novels, Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse and the Sailor who fell from Grace with the Sea by Yukio Mishima, the protagonists' thinking or actions are shaped through the interaction with their mentors, which ultimately results in them achieving their final goal.
Maryanne
The Size of Settings in The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea and Siddhartha Reflect the Protagonists’ Level of Understanding.
The size of settings in The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea by Yukio Mishima and Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse change in accordance to the level of understanding of protagonists Noboru Kuroda and Siddhartha.
Kevin
The role of sunlight in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha and Patrick Susskind’s Perfume: the Story of a Murderer
Sunlight is utilized to reveal various conceived conceptions of characters
Robert
The impact of clothing in Perfume: The story of a murderer by Patrick Süskind and Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
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In Patrick Süskind’s Perfume: The story of a murderer and Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha, clothes symbolizes the status and power, as well as hide and reveal true natures, of the protagonists
Seo Hyun
Effect of the boat in The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With The Sea by Yukio Mishima and the raft in Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse on navigating Ryuji and Siddhartha to their goals.
Although they are usually used to transport objects, the boat in The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With The Sea by Yukio Mishima and the raft in Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse, leads the two characters Ryuji and Siddhartha either away from or closer to their ultimate goals.
Janita
Women’s Creation of Conflict: The Sailor who Fell from Grace with the Sea by Yukio Mishima & Siddhartha by Herman Hesse


Ryuiji and Siddhartha’s struggle between two worlds are greatly affected by the women involved in their lives, pulling them against their true passion and happiness in the two novels, The Sailor who Fell from Grace with the Sea by Yukio Mishima and Siddhartha by Herman Hesse.
Sean
Aloneàdark and absurd thoughts

Brandon
Punishment

DaSol
Clothing